France Using Sails to Save Carbon

Compagnie de Transport Maritime a la Voile (CTMV), a French shipping company created the world’s first fleet of sail-driven merchant ships to transport Languedoc wines. The initiative is to support a sustainable economic development project.

Since CO² emissions from transport are expected to rise by 50% in Europe by 2010, the Treaty of Amsterdam project was introduced to integrate environmental considerations into community policies.

Using fleet that support renewable energy and biofuels, CTMV acquired a set of sailing vessels which meets environmental requirements and supports the Treaty of Amsterdam project, with an expectation of saving nearly 5 ounces of carbon per wine bottle compared to traditional shipping methods. Additionally, CTMV uses the Canal du Midi to transport client goods on to the fleet, which, in itself burns five times less fuel than traditional shipping. The canal connects the Garonne River to the Étang de Thau on the Mediterranean.

CTMV’s first voyage from Bordeaux to Dublin is already in transit, expected to arrive in Dublin next month, and future ports of call including England, Sweden and Demark will certainly assist in the initiative to save carbon.

“My idea at the beginning was to do something for the planet and something for the wines of Languedoc,” said Frederic Albert, founder of the shipping company, Compagnie de Transport Maritime a la Voile, CTMV.

To date, there are approximately four dozen Winemakers involved with CTMV’s sustainable transport, and approximately 200 more customers on the waiting list, which validates a strong awareness and concern regarding environmental policies. Winemaker’s currently utilizing CTMV sail-driven ships include:

Domaine BORIE de MAUREL
Domaine de PECH MENEL
Domaine HEGARTY
Domaine BORIE la VITARELLE
Domaine de VALAMBELLE
Domaine DELMAS
Domaine des PRES LASSES
Domaine des TERRES FALMET
Château ANGLANDE
Château la LIQUIERE
Château GRAGNOS
Château BELLEFONTAINE
Domaine du MAS CARLOT
Domaine MOULIN BATTANT
Domaine OLLIER–TAILLEFER
Domaine PIBAROT
Château COUJAN
Domaine PIN des MARGUERITES
Domaine PRAT MAJOU GAY
Domaine RIMBERT
Domaine SAVARY
Domaine de MARTINOLLES
Domaine Mas de CYNANQUE
Prieure ST MARTIN de LAURE
PRIEURE des MOURGUES
Cave de BERLOU
Cave de GENERAC
Cave de Saint GERVAIS
Domaine CLOS des AUGUSTINS
Domaine de la CROIX St EULALIE
Château des ESTANILLES
Domaine BELLES PIERRES
Château WIALA
Château VESSIERE
Château PERDIGUIER
Château MONTPEZAT
Château MIREMONT
Domaine La BORIE FOUISSEAU
Domaine DOM BRIAL
Domaine PLO NOTRE DAME
Château ST MARTIN de la GARRIGUE
Belem Cordes

Belem Nuit

Peniche

~ photo credits: CTMV & Sherpa

2016-12-30T21:49:38+00:00

About the Author:

Editor and co-founder of Enobytes.com, Pamela is a sommelier and former restaurant manager and wine buyer with Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET), Court of Master Sommeliers & Center for Wine Origins certification. She has contributed to or been quoted by various publications, including the Los Angeles Times, Sommelier Journal, Vegetarian Times, VIV Magazine, UC-Berkeley Astrobiology News, The Washington Post, the Associated Press, NPR and USA Today. True to her roots, she seeks varietal and appellation integrity and is always passionate about finding the next great bottle of wine.

2 Comments

  1. loulou February 22, 2008 at 3:55 PM - Reply

    I’m happy to hear of the formation of this company. Every little bit helps!
    The Canal du Midi is just that, a Canal, not a River. It was built in the mid 1600’s to transport goods, including wine, from France to England, bypassing Spain.

  2. enobytes February 22, 2008 at 6:43 PM - Reply

    Oops…a definite typo which has been corrected. I accidentally cut off the sentence. Thanks for pointing out the mistake!

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